Modern garden furniture by an interior designer

Modern garden furniture by an interior designer

Finding garden furniture to fit into your rear garden is actually quite a challenge. So in this article we are going through some of the best furniture available for sale today for gardens. We like to have a look at some of the most modern and up-to-date stuff so that we can keep up with all of the relevant trends for garden furniture, important for a designer!
Garden furniture should both be practical and functional as well as look good. Just being a feature in terms of looks is actually pretty wishy washy because you just simply can’t use it and it’s a waste. The Gardens one of the most functional and practical areas in your home and so therefore you really do need to have a garden furniture set that will match up to it.

Garden furniture doesn’t just necessarily mean table and chairs, it can mean everything from a garden workbench right through to playground area stuff for kids. Basically everything you can think of in between is garden furniture and anything that can make you live comfortable in the back garden garden is furniture. There are so many different aspects to garden furniture to make a complete home and in this article I want to go through some of the very best types and designs that would give you something comfortable when you’re in the back garden. And all brought to you by a garden interior designer!

Rattan garden furniture is really ‘in’ at the moment

Rattan garden furniture is really making its way back because it’s extremely durable and lightweight as well as being very efficient in terms of how easily you can clean it and how good it looks. Rattan garden furniture is a little bit on the expensive side at the moment but actually it makes a garden look really cool. If you can set a garden off with a bit of expensive rattan furniture then it’s not such a bad deal at all. Personally, I really like the fact that they normally come with detachable covers and cushions so that you can clean easily. The other great thing about rattan furniture is there so many people custom making it that you can actually almost build your own design garden interior!

Modern garden furniture by an interior designer
Modern garden furniture by an interior designer

Make sure your furniture has got removable covers in the garden

Following on from rattan furniture one of the most important things is that whatever garden furniture you buy in the garden, you make sure that this got removable covers. Removable covers solve a problem because so much wildlife will end up on top of all of your furniture that you really need to get a clean it. If it’s not removable then you’re in a situation where it could be thrown away in a couple of years because it looks so nasty. I’ve seen so many cheap furniture sets that basically end up scraps really quickly because basically there’s just no way to maintain them so make sure you get garden furniture with removable covers or alternatively get decent garden furniture covers.

Picking a glass table top is always good in the garden for low maintenance and easy cleaning

One of the best tips I can provide you the garden furniture is to buy furniture that’s got a glass top. Glass cleans extremely easily and if you pick glass that’s actually toughened then it’s extremely strong as well. You really can’t break toughened glass all that easily and you don’t have to worry about the safety of it because if for some reason a family was able to actually breaking it, then it will splinter into many pieces and each one of those would be totally harmless anyway. So as far as garden furniture goes, glass table tops are completely in. Just make sure that they’ve got some nice rounded corners so that if someone ever fell on one of them, it wouldn’t hurt them too much. Sharp corners can actually be quite dangerous and they look pretty nasty so yeah, definitely make sure you get curve corners on your glass.

Modern garden furniture by an interior designer
Modern garden furniture by an interior designer

Solid wood is always good in the garden for furniture

You can’t really go wrong with solid wood furniture in the garden because it looks stunning and also you can always just sand it off and then varnish or stain as necessary. Wooden garden furniture, as long as it’s basically kept well protected, will last forever. You just need to make sure that you don’t allow it to rot or be damaged by water and sunlight too much. But the great thing is even if that does happen, you can always basically repair it and make it good. So many people basically just sand down their garden chairs and tables and then just simply pop a stain or varnish over the top and they look nearly as good as new again. The other great thing about garden wood is the fact that you can have a dark wood look and is really in at the moment as far as designers go.

Picking a patio heater that matches with the rest of your patio garden set

My last tip for garden furniture is picking a really cool patio heater because we all know that the evenings in the summer are great and long, but they do get a little bit chilly. What you really need is a garden patio heater that fits in with garden furniture and a really cool barbecue, and a nice patio heater, and a nice set of chairs and table can really make your back garden look super cool.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this write-up on garden furniture and some ideas to go with. Interior garden design doesn’t have to be that complicated but you just need to make sure that you pick garden furniture wisely that matches your interior design style.

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Red fountain grass to spruce up your garden design

Red fountain grass to spruce up your garden design

Red fountain grass

Prized for its rich burgundy foliage and foxtail-like spikes, purple fountain grass (Pennisetum setaceum ‘Rubrum’) is an outstanding ornamental grass for flower beds or containers.

It adds intense colour and lofty height to the back of a border or the centre of a large container planting. The foliage is / to ½ inches wide and about 10 inches long. Its 12-inch plumes, arching above the foliage, appear purple-red in summer and turn brown in autumn. Pennesetum setaceum is native to tropical Africa and Southwest Asia. The cultivar ‘Rubrum’ is a perennial in the Uk and will spruce up your garden design.

Plant Facts

  • Common name: Red fountain grass; purple fountain grass
  • Botanical name: Pennisetum setaceum ‘Rubrum’
  • Plant type: Clump-forming perennial grass
  • Zones: 9 to 10
  • Height: 3 to 4 feet tall, except in the South, where it can reach 6 feet
  • Spread: 2 to 4 feet
  • Family: Poaceae
Pennisetum setaceum
Pennisetum setaceum

Growing conditions

  • Sun: Full sun.
  • Soil: A moist, well-drained site is ideal, but it will survive in clay or sandy soils if it has enough moisture.
  • Moisture: Average moisture; will not do well in wet sites.

Care

  • Mulch: Where hardy, none needed. Where not hardy, treat as an annual.
  • Pruning: Cut dead top growth in late fall or early spring in areas where the grass is a perennial.
  • Fertiliser: None needed.

Propagation:

  • Divide in late spring or early summer.

Pests and diseases

  • None significant
Pennisetum setaceum
Pennisetum setaceum

Garden notes

  • ‘Rubrum’ may reseed in perennial beds-watch for young seedlings and remove them so the grass won’t become invasive.
  • Flowers look great in arrangements.
  • Ideal to spruce up your garden design
  • ‘Rubrum’ tolerates windy sites.
  • Another cultivar, ‘Rubrum Dwarf’, grows only 2 ½ to 3 feet tall with a more compact form but the same outstanding colour.
  • Plant next to Gloriosa Daisy Mixed (Rudbeckia hirta). With golden rays and burgundy-brown centres, the flowers bloom most of the summer, reach 36 inches tall, and provide a sunny contrast to the dark grass.
  • Related species
  • Pennisetum glaucum is millet, a significant food source in some parts of the world. A new ornamental millet, Pennisetum glaucum ‘Purple Majesty’, was recently awarded a Gold Medal by All-American Selections. Described as “tall, dark, and handsome,” it has a rich burgundy colour, grows 5 feet tall, and sports seed spikes that attract birds.

All in the family

  • Poaceae is a huge family of grasses, including St. Augustine grass, Bermuda grass, Kentucky bluegrass, corn, rice, and bamboo.
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Parry’s agave can work wonders in a garden landscape revamp

Parry’s agave can work wonders in a garden landscape revamp

Parry’s agave

The drought-tolerant Parry’s agave (Agave parryi) is a striking accent plant for the xeriscape garden.

It forms heavily toothed, compact rosettes of grey-blue, sword-like leaves with a dark spine at the tip of each leaf. Typical of agaves, the plant sends up a flowering spike only after several years of growth. The towering 12- to 18-foot flower stalk produces pink to red buds that open to yellow flowers. The common name century plant comes from the incorrect belief that agaves grow 100 years before blooming. Parry’s agave is found in the UK and can work wonders in a garden landscape revamp. Given it’s sized its ideal for a garden landscape revamp project.

Plant Facts

  • Common name: Parry’s agave, hardy century plant, mescal
  • Botanical name: Agave parryi
  • Plant type: Perennial succulent
  • Height: Leaves 12 inches long; flower panicle on stalk 12 to 18 feet tall
  • Zones: 8 to 10, though hardiness varies depending on plant habitat. Check for cold tolerance at the nursery where you buy it.
  • Family: Agavaceae
Agave parryi
Agave parryi

Growing conditions

  • Sun: Full sun
  • Soil: Cactus potting mix indoors; well-drained, dry, sandy soil outdoors.
  • Moisture: For outdoor plants, supplemental water will encourage more growth, but roots will rot if kept wet. For container-grown Agave, water frequently in summer, reduce water in the fall, and water once a month in winter.

Care

  • Pruning: None required.
  • Mulch: In areas with wet winters, mulch may encourage root rot. In dry climates, mulch young plants during winter to protect newly established roots.
  • Fertiliser: Apply only in summer so plants harden off before cooler weather.

Cultivars

  • The Flagstaff form of Agave parryi (pictured), introduced in 2005 by High Country Gardens, has 18-inch-long leaves and a 12-foot-tall flower. While it likes sun and heat, it’s one of the most cold-hardy forms of Agave parryi. Zones 4 to 10.

Garden Notes

  • Avoid overwatering, especially in fall and winter.
  • In areas colder than Zone 7, plant Agave parryi in containers and place around the garden in summer and bring indoors during winter.
Agave parryi
Agave parryi

Pests and diseases

  • Root rot occurs in poorly drained soils.
  • Mealybugs and scale attack the plant.

Propagation

  • Sow seeds in early spring in a warm spot (about 70ºF).
  • As the plant matures, it forms offsets (smaller plants). Separate offsets from the main plant in spring or fall. If rooted, plant in soil (where climate permits), or plant in a container; if unrooted, plant in a combination of peat and sand until roots form.

All in the family

  • Other members of the Agavaceae family include Yucca spp., Phormium spp., Sansevieria trifasciata (mother-in-law’s tongue), and Hesperaloe parviflora.
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